Any Physical Activity Better than None!

Any Physical Activity Better than None!

Are you tempted to say you are too tired or too busy to exercise? An 18-year study of 24,000 adults ages 39-79 has found a significant link between physical activity and a reduced risk of heart disease. The elderly who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise were 14%...
Healthy Habits Can Offset Genetic Risk

Healthy Habits Can Offset Genetic Risk

Worried you will have cardiovascular disease because it is in your genes? Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found while a high genetic tendency indeed increases risk of heart disease, so does an unhealthy lifestyle. The good news is, with a healthy...
Regularly Skip Breakfast?

Regularly Skip Breakfast?

According to a study of 4000 asymptomatic, middle-aged Spanish adults who had no history of cardiovascular disease, those who regularly skipped breakfast were more likely to have subclinical atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic plaque was determined by ultrasound. After...
Think Twice before Stopping Low-dose Aspirin

Think Twice before Stopping Low-dose Aspirin

A large-scale Swedish study (600,000) of low-dose aspirin users found the risk for cardiovascular events rose significantly after discontinuation. Risk increased soon after stopping and continued over time. (This study was partially funded by industry.) LifeTip: Think...
What Are the Saturated Fat Offenders?

What Are the Saturated Fat Offenders?

The AHA Presidential Advisory rightly cautioned us about the potential dangers of coconut oil. However, coconut oil represents only a small fraction of all U.S vegetable oils. Americans consume about 1.5 pounds of coconut per capita per year compared to cheese at 35...
AHA Takes A Stand Against Saturated Fat

AHA Takes A Stand Against Saturated Fat

An advisory from the American Heart Association strongly recommends replacing the intake of saturated fat with poly- and mono-unsaturated vegetable fats to help prevent heart disease. Replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrates and sugars is not supported. This...
“T” Therapy May Speed Up Atherosclerosis

“T” Therapy May Speed Up Atherosclerosis

Is testosterone treatment of older men with low testosterone levels good for the heart? Apparently not, based on a randomized clinical trial of 170 men aged 65 or older. The experimental group received testosterone gel for a year to attain youthful testosterone levels...
Suboptimal Dietary Factors Associated with Death from Heart Disease

Suboptimal Dietary Factors Associated with Death from Heart Disease

A comparative risk assessment model has estimated that 45.4% of all cardiometabolic (heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes) deaths in U.S. adults was associated with suboptimal consumption of the following specific dietary factors: High sodium intake (9.5%). Low...
Saturated Fats Again Linked to CHD

Saturated Fats Again Linked to CHD

Frank Hu, MD, MPH, PhD from Harvard University published his third paper linking saturated fats (SFA) to increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. In analyzing 24-28 years of follow-up data in two large prospective studies a strong correlation with all the major...
Preventing “Holiday Heart Syndrome”

Preventing “Holiday Heart Syndrome”

Holiday revelers be warned: it is well known that heavy drinking, even in the occasional binge, leads to atrial fibrillation (AF). Now in a sobering review, Australian scientists report even though small amounts of alcohol are considered by many to be...
The Sour Side of the Sugar Industry

The Sour Side of the Sugar Industry

In an analysis of archived correspondence between the Sugar Research Foundation (today the Sugar Association) and several prominent Harvard nutrition researchers in the mid-1960s, it has been revealed that secret support was given in an attempt to shift the blame from...
Heart Disease Still the Leading Cause of Death

Heart Disease Still the Leading Cause of Death

Nationally, heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S., but cancer is the top killer in several subgroups and geographic regions. Cancer is the leading cause of death in Hispanic populations as well as non-Hispanic Asians and Pacific Islanders. It is...

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